Category: Educators

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Personalized learning is an educational methodology. It is not just the incorporation of technology into a classroom, but it is a way of life for many teachers and schools looking to provide students with the knowledge they’ll need to more effectively participate in jobs of the future.

Here are some examples of what personalized learning looks like in the classroom.

It’s true that personalized learning has been around for many years; however, we predict that 2019 will be the year that personalized learning is more fully integrated into many classrooms around the U.S. Here’s why:

Student populations are more diverse. It’s always been difficult to classify a single classroom of students as having specific characteristics. Students come into their learning environments with many differences, including the basics like gender, race, nationality, and ability. Personalized learning is an effective way to meet diversity head-on.

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Technology has improved.
Technology now provides educators with more options than have ever been available in the past. From digital devices to software to learning platforms, educators can use technology to tailor lesson plans around students’ individual needs and learning styles. They can also use this information to more easily collect data on students’ performance.

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Teachers are becoming guides. Personalized learning is one way for teachers to take on the role of a classroom guide or facilitator. Rather than lecturing classes about specific topics, teachers may now provide their students with access to a variety of independent learning experiences while allowing students to take control of their own education.

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Personalized Learning in Action

One of the best outcomes of personalized learning is that it yields higher student engagement -- something we can all get behind. Personalized learning allows kids to look at certain topics under the lens of their own interests and goals. And as educators explore how to empower students to be leaders of tomorrow (both in and outside of the classroom), personalized learning will enable them to draw on the issues that students care about as fodder for both information-gathering and action.

As an added bonus, the move to personalized learning will also help teachers to transition from the role of a lecturer to that of a guide/facilitator. In this way, they will be free to meet their students where they are at, and to better accommodate their individual needs.

While there are many schools currently leaning in to personalized learning in the classroom, we still have a long way to go to fully incorporate this methodology nationwide. Do you have any examples of teachers or schools who are doing this well? Share them with us @littleBits to get the conversation started -- let’s learn from each other.