Sphero + littleBits Join Forces!

By Vicki Grisanti

SPHERO AND LITTLEBITS JOIN FORCES
TO BECOME THE EDTECH MARKET LEADER
AND ACCELERATE PLAY-BASED LEARNING FOR KIDS

Over the past nine years, Sphero and littleBits have each created entirely new categories of hands-on learning tools that enable invention and STEAM education through play and technology. Combined, the two companies have reached over six million students and 65,000 teachers across 35,000 schools globally — and have sold more than $500 million in Sphero robots and littleBits kits. Today, littleBits joins Sphero to advance their common mission — inspiring the creators and inventors of tomorrow.

Through this acquisition, Sphero becomes the largest player in its market. With a comprehensive offering of hardware, software, curriculum, and training, it is positioned to shape the $150 billion education technology industry.

Sphero, with the addition of the littleBits line, will now feature a portfolio of over 140 patents in robotics, electronics, software, and the Internet of Things. Teachers will have access to hundreds of thousands of community-generated inventions and activities, and over a thousand lessons tied to NGSS, CSTA and Common Core standards. Sphero and littleBits will also rally their enthusiastic and loyal networks of distinguished educators around the world that they've cultivated through their ambassador programs – with over 67 Sphero Heroes and 50 littleBits Bitstar Educators. 

"Sphero and littleBits are on a mission to make hands-on learning fun and memorable," said Paul Berberian, Sphero's CEO. "Together, we're able to make an even greater impact by delivering the best possible solution — whether it is programming a robot to solve a maze or building an electronic music synthesizer. There are infinite learning possibilities — and they're all fun."

According to a Harris poll1, 91% of teachers say they would like to integrate more hands-on learning in their classes, and research shows that students who enjoy weekly hands-on learning activities fare 40-70% better in science, math and other subjects2.

"When I studied engineering, it was top down, test-based," said Ayah Bdeir, founder of littleBits. "I hated it and wanted to quit every semester. Then I got exposed to the pedagogy of learning through play and my life changed; no one could peel me away from learning, inventing, creating. Together, littleBits and Sphero are now bringing this experience to kids everywhere."

With this deal, Sphero plans to accelerate international growth and acquire other products and companies to further expand its portfolio of STEAM products and tools. The company will have offices in Boulder, New York, and Hong Kong with Paul Berberian as CEO. Ayah Bdeir will be moving on from littleBits to pursue her next adventure.

ABOUT SPHERO: 
Sphero has been inspiring the creators of tomorrow through creative learning and play since 2010. From its humble beginnings in Boulder, CO, Sphero has become the #1 robot in education, available in 40,000+ schools, clubs and institutions globally. With new offerings coming out all the time to help kids start, grow, and graduate with Sphero, our robots and products truly go #BeyondCode. Learn more at sphero.com.

ABOUT LITTLEBITS:
littleBits products have been transforming the way kids learn so they can grow up to be tomorrow's changemakers — no matter their age, gender, race, nationality, or ability. Millions of STEAM (Science Technology Engineering Art and Math) kits have been sold in over 70 countries. littleBits Electronics, Inc. was founded in 2011 by Ayah Bdeir, TED Senior Fellow, MIT Media Lab Alum and Inc Magazine Top 100 Female Founders. Learn more at littlebits.com.

1 https://theharrispoll.com/global-confidence-poll-executive-summary/

2 The National Assessment of Educational progress

2 comments


  • Congrats and looking forward to seeing where this goes!

    Josh Chan on

  • Hi! It’s a great news. I work with Littlebits and Sphero and they are the best!

    Jorge Campdepadros on

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